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Panel [clear filter]
Tuesday, August 15
 

11:15am EDT

Machine Learning for Procedural Content Generation
Panelists: Alexander Zook, Adam Summerville, Matthew Guzdial and Amy Hoover

Abstract
The panel on Machine Learning for Procedural Content Generation will expose the FDG audience to the emerging area of research around applying machine learning to content modeling, analysis, and generation. The panel will showcase the existing work in the eld, discuss current challenges, and highlight open opportunities for further research in the area. By exposing new ways for AI and machine learning to intersect with games we hope to encourage wider participation in this emerging domain and expose the FDG community to new techniques for studying games.


Tuesday August 15, 2017 11:15am - 12:15pm EDT
Grand I

11:15am EDT

Playing with History: Creating Games Around Historical Themes & Content
Panelists: Celia Pearce, Sarah Zaidan, Tracy Fullerton, Kellian Adams and Lizzie Stark

Abstract
As games continue to broaden both their content and applications, a set of practices have emerged around “documentary games” that deal with real-world topics and narratives. A sub-genre of games in this category, history games, seeks to craft direct, immersive and participatory forms of engagement with history. While games covering historical topics have been circulating for some time, there has not been a great deal of discussion about the variety methodologies for engaging with historical themes and topics. The aim of this panel is to bring together game design practitioners from diverse backgrounds, including three academics creating vastly different games, an indie developer, and a LARP designer and facilitator, to explore questions around design of games with historical content. One of the challenges of games in this genre is that history has already happened in the past; in some essential way, historical narratives are fixed. This poses some interesting design challenges, and also creates opportunities for experimentation and innovation. This panel will be structured as a dynamic conversation between five practitioners who are actively engaged in creating games that take their inspiration from history.

Tuesday August 15, 2017 11:15am - 12:15pm EDT
Centerville

3:50pm EDT

Game Design & Development Curriculum: History and Future Directions
Panelists: Elizabeth Lawley, Roger Altizer, Tracy Fullerton, Andy Phelps and Constance Steinkuehler

Abstract
It has been nearly twenty years since the first undergraduate degree program in computer game development was established in 1998. Since that time, the number and size of programs in game design and development have grown at a rapid pace. While there were early efforts to establish curricular guidelines for the field, these face a number of challenges given the diverse range of academic homes for game-related programs. This panel will address the history of curricular development in the field, both in individual programs and across institutions. It will also explore the potential risks and rewards of developing curricular and/or accreditation guidelines for the field.

Tuesday August 15, 2017 3:50pm - 4:50pm EDT
Grand I

3:50pm EDT

Intergenerational Game Play and Family Learning: Current Insights and Future Directions
Panelists: Elisabeth Gee, Sinem Siyahhan, Kelly Tran, Ben Devane, Jeremy Dietmeier, Ben J. Miller, Kristen Missall, Salloni Nanda, Rahul Banerjee and Jason Yip

Abstract
Recent studies on families who play video games together suggest that playing video games as a family has a positive impact on family well-being and learning. At the same time, scholarship around the nature of intergenerational gameplay, designing game experiences for families, and methodological considerations around studying games in the context of families is relatively small. This panel addresses this gap by bringing together researchers and designers that work at the intersection of games, families, and learning. Panel participants will discuss the cultural framing and theoretical underpinnings of intergenerational gameplay. Through case studies, they will illustrate the forms intergenerational game play take across a variety of gaming platforms, activity structures, and different children’s age groups. Future research and design directions in this area will be discussed.

Tuesday August 15, 2017 3:50pm - 4:50pm EDT
Centerville
 
Wednesday, August 16
 

4:50pm EDT

The Grassroots Game: Players, Participants, and Infrastructures in Esports from the Ground Up
Panelists: T.L. Taylor, Emma Witkowski, Marcella Szablewicz, Will Partin and Abe Stein

Abstract
This panel looks at compelling ground up histories and practices of grassroots esports involvement, from industry and state level engagement to homespun practices. We explore both the ongoing local and community-based engagements as they exist alongside and within an increasingly institutionalized industry. Our field of view is international and the cases explore esports in North American, China, and Australia, as well as situating the scene as a multi-national venture with global markets. We explore how various funding models are interwoven with fandom and leveraging community. We look at how media rhetoric around addiction is impacting amateur and pro-aspirational esports play. We tackle how infrastructures, from broadband networks to the material spaces of game cafes, form important nodes in understanding how a local esports scene functions. And we present a history of esports broadcasting which situates our current media moment as rising out of a DIY culture.

Wednesday August 16, 2017 4:50pm - 5:50pm EDT
Grand I

4:50pm EDT

What’s ‘Critical’ About Critical Game Design?
Panelists: Rebecca Rouse, James Malazita et al. 

Abstract
What do we mean by the critical in critical game design? And what is pressing about critical game design given our current social, cultural, and political context? A surge of scholarship has developed around the topic of Critical Game Design as researchers, developers, and artists seek to create socially conscious and transformative games and digital media. However, as Shaowen and Jeffrey Bardzell provoke in “What is ‘Critical’ about Critical Design,” the critical qualities of Critical Design are often underexplored both in theory and in research practice. This panel brings together established and emerging scholars in the field to discuss all aspects of critical game design, across theory, practice, pedagogy and research.

Wednesday August 16, 2017 4:50pm - 5:50pm EDT
Centerville
 
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